me démander qqch   contribuer   Material culture, art history, food history, personal, and lots of Louis XIV

geisterseher:

Bibliothèque nationale de France, département Estampes et photographie’. M.elle Vainqueur, coefures à la St Vincent’ (1779). The taking of Saint Vincent 16-18 June 1779.

geisterseher:

Bibliothèque nationale de France, département Estampes et photographie’. M.elle Vainqueur, coefures à la St Vincent’ (1779). The taking of Saint Vincent 16-18 June 1779.

(Source: bnf.fr)

— 10 hours ago with 16 notes

#Costume History 
Ad for Air France! Seen in a parking garage near the Guggenheim

Ad for Air France! Seen in a parking garage near the Guggenheim

— 2 days ago with 6 notes

#Louis XIV  #i will be flying airfrance soon yayyyyy  #france 
histoireinsolite asked: I'm pretty the gilet à la Robespierre refers to the oversized lapels rather than the color. I've seen references to them being white, red, or pink. I did a project on lapels/collars for grad school two years ago, but stopped in the 1790s. This would have been such an interesting continuation!


Answer:

needsmoreresearch:

edwarddespard:

pilferingapples:

needsmoreresearch:

I hope you don’t mind me publishing this?

But yeah, wide lapels would make the most sense—and in fact, looking again at Grantaire’s gilet à la Robespierre, it’s scarlet and he shows off its pointed lapels. 

And I guess Hugo and Gautier have a bit of a squabble about whether Gautier had a Robespierre waistcoat…?

There seems to have been a lot of debate about who wore what in general. Romantic Fashion Statements were  apparently SRS BSNS— I wasn’t joking about Gautier having AN ENTIRE CHAPTER about his waistcoat in the memoirs.

…It seems like there should be a joke there but that’s it, that’s the joke, I don’t know what I could possibly add. ACTUAL ROMANTICS ARE THE MOST RIDICULOUS.

I’m leaning towards lapel shape being the key factor. Certainly from fashion history texts, it indicates they are high and turned down. Not as sure about size of the lapels, although there were certainly oversized lapels in the era. The fashion dictionary source is more about them being 1.) high and 2.) turned down, which I suspect relates to the Robespierre collar women wore in the Edwardian period.

You’re probably right.  Regarding the size—there was that spell with the Incroyables and their exaggerated, oversized lapels, and I have the sense that that got popularly mixed into a general image of Revolutionary Fashion (…ironically, I guess).  I wonder to what extent that image persisted into the 19th century?

Can’t be high and turned down without being oversized for the period! 1830s men usually had small shawl collar-like lapels on their waistcoats. The whole deal with the Robespierre waistcoat was that the lapels were big enough to fall outside the coat! Obviously calling it after Robespierre is a bit arbitrary considering the range of collars that got labeled as such, and the Incroyable look certainly got mixed in there without considering their politics… Oh, the 19th century.

— 3 days ago with 28 notes

#robespierre fashion  #I trust very few costume dictionaries btw 
The Robespierre Collar featured in the Milwaukee Sentinel August 18, 1912

The Robespierre Collar featured in the Milwaukee Sentinel August 18, 1912

— 3 days ago with 16 notes

#robespierre fashion  #gilet  #robespierre  #20th Century  #Costume History 
museumnerd:

Who went to this African Arts Museum in Bed-Stuy, Brooklyn when it was open? What was it like? (I’m guessing it was Danny Simmons’s, brother of Russell, collection?)

I used to live super close to this place, but it was never open! *correction, the neighborhood is actually Clinton Hill :)

museumnerd:

Who went to this African Arts Museum in Bed-Stuy, Brooklyn when it was open? What was it like? (I’m guessing it was Danny Simmons’s, brother of Russell, collection?)

I used to live super close to this place, but it was never open! *correction, the neighborhood is actually Clinton Hill :)

— 3 days ago with 35 notes

#i love new york  #brooklyn  #museums 
mimic-of-modes:

Caracos à l’Innocence reconnu or à la Cauchoise, will teach for a thousand years that in 1786, an unhappy Cook named Marie-Françoise-Victoire Salmon, who was seen twice led to the stake to be burned as guilty of the most execrable poisoning, and who, twice, was snatched from the hands of her executioners through the vigorous and steadfast virtue of M. Cauchois, her Lawyer, was finally declared innocent by the Parlement of Paris. … Under the caraco, the Woman wears a little corset, or gilet, if one likes, of white Pekin.
Her petticoat is of apple green Pekin; it is trimmed with a volant of matching fabric, with a reversed head. - Cabinet des Modes, 22e Cahier, 1ere Figure

mimic-of-modes:

Caracos à l’Innocence reconnu or à la Cauchoise, will teach for a thousand years that in 1786, an unhappy Cook named Marie-Françoise-Victoire Salmon, who was seen twice led to the stake to be burned as guilty of the most execrable poisoning, and who, twice, was snatched from the hands of her executioners through the vigorous and steadfast virtue of M. Cauchois, her Lawyer, was finally declared innocent by the Parlement of Paris. … Under the caraco, the Woman wears a little corset, or gilet, if one likes, of white Pekin.


Her petticoat is of apple green Pekin; it is trimmed with a volant of matching fabric, with a reversed head. - Cabinet des Modes, 22e Cahier, 1ere Figure

— 3 days ago with 9 notes

#so beautiful  #Costume History  #I'm a sucker for lapels  #18th Century 

uispeccoll:

In case you need to intricately carve a pear, here is La Maniera di Trinciare (The method for cutting), 1570. This book is entirely made of engravings so the binding is also pretty unique. Call number: Szathmary TX885 .A14 1570

(via uispeccoll)

— 4 days ago with 139 notes

#food history  #16th century  #book history